Long-Term Pika Monitoring

Front Range Resources
for Trained Pika Patrollers

Front Range Resources

2021 Updates and Waivers

If you didn’t send us your signed waiver in 2020, you MUST do so in 2021 to participate in the CPP.

If you didn’t send us your signed COVID acknowledgement in 2020, you MUST do so in 2021 to participate in the CPP.

If you’re a minor and you didn’t send us your signed waiver in 2020, you MUST do so in 2021 to participate in the CPP.

Data Collection

Site Sign-Up and Tracking

Sign up and record your visit to a Front Range site in 2021

Compare the different pika monitoring sites to find one that suits you

Learn all the details about each high priority pika site

Learn all the details about each lower priority pika site

Data Submission

Navigation Resources

Downloadable files showing the locations and routes for Front Range sites through Gaia GPS

Learn how to set up and use Gaia GPS for pika monitoring

If you would like to borrow a CPP GPS unit for pika monitoring, you can use this manual to learn about it in detail

If you would like to borrow a CPP GPS unit for pika monitoring, you can use this manual to learn the key points of how to use it

In 2010, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service declined to list the American pika as threatened or endangered, citing uncertainty about whether the species was likely to be vulnerable to climate change across its entire range.

Spurred on by this, Rocky Mountain Wild and Denver Zoo created the Colorado Pika Project to collect the long-term, large-scale data needed for conservation and management of pika and their alpine ecosystems under future climate change scenarios.Since then, hundreds of volunteer community scientists have surveyed for pika across the Front Range.

While the Front Range is just one of the four research projects in the Front Range Pika Project, it is by far the oldest and most popular.To learn about how you can join the Pika Patrol in the Front Range, go here:

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